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LGS Luncheon – April 2017

Abstract:

Title: The Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary Deposit in LaSalle Parish, Louisiana

Kody Shellhouse

The Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary Deposit is an impact-induced sedimentary deposit across the Gulf of Mexico basin, deposited due to the catastrophic effects of the Chicxulub Impact.  The purpose of this project was to determine what the lithology and sedimentology evidence found in the Justiss Louisiana Central IPNH No. 2 well core from LaSalle Parish, Louisiana, tells us about the depositional history of the end-Cretaceous deposit and how the formation of this deposit was influenced by the effects of the Chicxulub impact over 1000 km to the south.  Project objectives were to characterize the end-Cretaceous sediments found in LaSalle Parish, Louisiana, to determine their depositional history as it relates to the Chicxulub impact in Yucatan, Mexico and to relate these onshore sediments to the basin-wide Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary Deposit.  After making a full core description and analyzing 35 thin sections from throughout the core, evidence suggests that the end-Cretaceous chalk was deposited by seismically-induced mass wasting and later tsunami activity as a direct result of the Chicxulub Impact, and that the previously-proposed thickness of the Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary Deposit may need to be revised.

 

 


 Bio:

 

Kody Shellhouse 

is currently completing a Master’s in Geology at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, with his thesis focused on the Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary Deposit in LaSalle Parish, Louisiana. He has previously worked for the Bureau of Land Management as a Natural Resource Specialist intern and for Badger Oil as a Petroleum Geology intern while in Lafayette. Originally from central Georgia, Kody received his BS in Geology with a Minor in French from Auburn University, studying abroad for a semester in Nice, France. In his time off, Kody enjoys hiking, cooking, playing guitar and drums, reading history, and exploring new places.

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